We are interested in the question of how and when young children begin to sound like the people round about them. Do parents use dialect forms when talking to their children or more standard forms? Do children first start with dialect forms, then learn the standard or vice versa? Or indeed, both at once? Jennifer has conducted a research project on these and other questions, with a large database of recordings of mothers and children in Buckie in everyday interaction – walks in the park, making supper, playing, getting ready for school, learning to count. You can read about this research in the papers below:

 

Smith, J., Durham, M., and Richards, H. (2013) The social and linguistic in the acquisition of sociolinguistic variation. Linguistics

Download here: draft Smith, Durham, Richards (2013) linguistic & social in acquisition

 

Smith, J., Durham, M., and Fortune, L. (2009) Universal and dialect-specific pathways of acquisition: Caregivers, children, and t/d deletion. Language Variation and Change, 21 . pp. 69-95

Download here: Smith,Duram&Fortune (2009) Universal and dialect-specific pathways of acquisition

 

Smith, J., Durham, M., and Fortune, L. (2007) “Mam, ma troosers is fa’in doon!” Community, caregiver and child in the acquisition of variation in Scottish dialect. Language Variation and Change, 19 (1). pp. 63-99.

Download here: Smith&Durham (2007) “Mam ma troosers is faan doon”